Clara Barton

The primary source I choose is a letter from Clara Barton who is the founder of the American Red Cross to Henry Wilson who was a senator. Letters written during the civil war usually included instructions for sending relief supplies and detailed observations in which it illustrated Clara Barton’s life in the trenches with the soldiers. Just like it is mention in this letter “You are no stranger to the manner in which most of my time is spent, and as often and fearfully as I watch the spirits of brave men go out amid the thunder and carnage of battle, you will not think it strange that any recommendation or movement which has for its object the alleviation of the terrible suffering at the battle field should attract all my attention, and call forth my plea, however earnest or however feeble.” Here she explains what she sees the solders go through. This primary source is important because it demonstrates what is going on during the civil war in the view of a women and someone who is not fighting in the war. It gives us a different view of what went down during the civil war.

This primary source is important because we get an insight of how life was like during the civil war for a woman. Not only in this letter but in many of the letters Clara Barton’s wrote. In other of her letters it talks about her travels, speaking engagements, and charity work, her life in Dansville, and her work as the superintended of the Reformatory Prison for Women in Southfarmington, Mass. Letters like these are historically significant because we are able to relate to them, get more insight of what happen during this time, and most important it’s a form of evidence. For example a letter from Clara Barton to her cousin Jerry details her breakdown in London, her views on the Stanley and Livingston affair, and her activities in France.

Melisa Jurado HIS 275

http://search.library.duke.edu/search?id=DUKE001021269

https://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/civil_war/BartonLetter_1181863-2.htm

http://www.civilwar-online.com/2012/12/december-12-1862-clara-barton-to-her.html

Gilson, Helen L. Letters
Society Miscellaneous Collection
Collection No. 425

 

Born in 1835 Helen Gilson, an orphan from Boston felt a strong need to help and provide every ounce of her willpower in the war effort. Although she did apply to become a nurse and was reject she eventually joined the Sanitary Commission. During her year in service she religiously wrote letters to her friend Thomas Kimber; he lived in Philadelphia and they would explain how her time was being spent and how her service was being occupied. She would also ask of him to send certain items that could help the hospital.Gilson began her time in Washington and later moved else where along with the army, she expressed how she loved to send her time in Washington however she feels most productive and self-fulfilling in the hospital because she understood that’s where help is needed 

She was first station as 2nd division, 3rd corps on Potomac Creek. Gilson as was said before would ask Kimber for items such as food so she could make custard for the sick and also asked for other small foods to help the smaller hospitals. Gilson was often praised and was seen as an angel by many of the wounded. The document cited a quote from her letters “As a general rule, the battlefield is not the place for women. In the General Hospitals is their sphere of usefulness. But no one who has ever seen Miss Gilson in the Field Hospitals can for a moment doubt but that in her case is the great, almost solitary exception to the rule.” This quote is explaining how even though she is a women and that women were not expected to be in the fields; she was great enough to be able to participate in the usefulness in the field. 

This document is historically important because as they have stated women were not expected nor felt they had any obligation to be near the field where they would fine extreme suffering from the soldiers. Gilson proves very well that women could broke the bond that separated women from the battle fields. Gilson was praised for her duties going above and beyond for her country. these letters show that women could be more the just a hospital nurse. 

http://hsp.org/collections/catalogs-research-tools/subject-guides/women-during-the-civil-war 

-Jessica Bravo

Women were a vital part to the gathering of information and the secret leaking from the union side of the war, They made it possible to know the odds and ends that no one would know without these women spies, 
This photo is of Belle Boyd and she was a confederate spy. This was in the year 1843. Belle was 17 when she was arrested because a union soldier had broken into her name and insulted her mother. She was investigated by the union and cleared from all the charges attached with the crime. She used her good looks and charm to grab and get information from soldiers and passed it along to the confederacy. Eventually she got caught and was thrown into jail in July 1862. And then she was freed only to get captured again. Belle refused to be silenced and didn’t care how much jail time she would receive. 
This is important to women’s history because without women who were spies and doing whatever in there power to gather information about the union which would give them the advantage. 
-Harrianna Thompson

Women were a vital part to the gathering of information and the secret leaking from the union side of the war, They made it possible to know the odds and ends that no one would know without these women spies, 

This photo is of Belle Boyd and she was a confederate spy. This was in the year 1843. Belle was 17 when she was arrested because a union soldier had broken into her name and insulted her mother. She was investigated by the union and cleared from all the charges attached with the crime. She used her good looks and charm to grab and get information from soldiers and passed it along to the confederacy. Eventually she got caught and was thrown into jail in July 1862. And then she was freed only to get captured again. Belle refused to be silenced and didn’t care how much jail time she would receive. 

This is important to women’s history because without women who were spies and doing whatever in there power to gather information about the union which would give them the advantage. 

-Harrianna Thompson

Woman had many different roles during the Civil War. Some of those roles were being nurses, spies, cross-dressing soldiers, or volunteers. I found the idea of women cross-dressing as soldiers to be different. Knowing that women went out of their way to dress up as the opposite sex to fight for their country was an amazing amount of bravery. Therefore, specifically, I found Deborah Sampson Gannett to be the most interesting cross-dresser. 
The image above was used as the cover for Sampson’s memories. The description of the book was a positive portrayal of her life. Due to her being decisive and not messing around she was able to stay focused on her duties as a soldier. Soon after being wounded in battle, her secret was discovered. In a letter written by Paul Revere, he addressed how in judging Sampson for such mannish duties he believed her to be masculine but instead was surprised by her being the complete opposite. 
I believe this source to be historically significant to women’s history because it shows the great lengths women will go to prove they’re capable of what men can do. Yet, at the same time, these historical sources show how dedicated women were to support the country.
-Symone Beard

Woman had many different roles during the Civil War. Some of those roles were being nurses, spies, cross-dressing soldiers, or volunteers. I found the idea of women cross-dressing as soldiers to be different. Knowing that women went out of their way to dress up as the opposite sex to fight for their country was an amazing amount of bravery. Therefore, specifically, I found Deborah Sampson Gannett to be the most interesting cross-dresser. 

The image above was used as the cover for Sampson’s memories. The description of the book was a positive portrayal of her life. Due to her being decisive and not messing around she was able to stay focused on her duties as a soldier. Soon after being wounded in battle, her secret was discovered. In a letter written by Paul Revere, he addressed how in judging Sampson for such mannish duties he believed her to be masculine but instead was surprised by her being the complete opposite. 

I believe this source to be historically significant to women’s history because it shows the great lengths women will go to prove they’re capable of what men can do. Yet, at the same time, these historical sources show how dedicated women were to support the country.

-Symone Beard

Nancy Hill Morgan is the woman pictured above. During the first few weeks of the Civil War, Morgan and Mary Alford Heard formed a group called the Nancy Hart militia. It formed in LaGrange after most of the men left to fight the war. LaGrange was a vulnerable town because it had an intact railroad and it was between the Confederate capital and another city. They called a meeting in a schoolhouse and almost 40 women came trying to participate and defend their homes. They didn’t have experience with firearms so they were trained by a physician named A. C Ware, he was still in town because of a disability. They met twice a week and soon they were experts. The were a military group but they also helped by being nurses. Many injured men would come and when LaGrange’s four hospitals were full, some of the Nancy Harts would take patients in their homes. 

I was attracted to the picture of Nancy Hill Morgan, that is why I chose this excerpt. She looks so tough and I can just see her leading a group of women. She kind of looks like Betty DeVille from the Rugrats, Phil and Lil’s mother. In the show Betty is loud and in charge and that’s exactly how I think Morgan was. She looks like she was always dominant. This source is historically significant for women’s history because it shows how complex these women were. They weren’t only the soft and domestic females that men tended to see them but they were tough as well. It’s a great example of how equal men and women are and all throughout women’s history it is a constant fight towards equality. This militia shows men that not only can women fulfill the roles society gives us but we can fill men’s roles as well. It is important to the Civil War because it shows women were not afraid to push the limits. They did anything they could to protect their homes and lives. 

-Valerie Turcios

mcuhistory
Spymasters 
Spy masters were used during the civil war to get information about the Confederates to use against them for a victory.
  Elizabeth Van Lew was a very notable spymaster during the Civil War.  She was able to use her family farm as a meeting place to relay messages for the General.  Elizabeth and her mother often visited the local prisons regularly to overhear information about the enemies’ possible advancements. They often overheard information from the prison guards and inmates and later used the information for their benefit. She was able to decode in messages the potential troop movements for the Union General. She also was able to use former slaves as her accomplice as they worked in the Confederate White House. Together they were able to work together and acquire vital information about the enemy such as strategic plans against the Union. Van Lew reported this information and the union was able to use this to their advantage. This source is significantly historical to women history because although most women chose to not to partake in the war, they played a huge contribution to the success of the Union. I chose this article because the techniques used by spymaster were mind blowing. Spymaster overall were created when getting the job done.
Civilwarsaga.com
Brionna Adams

Spymasters

Spy masters were used during the civil war to get information about the Confederates to use against them for a victory.

  Elizabeth Van Lew was a very notable spymaster during the Civil War.  She was able to use her family farm as a meeting place to relay messages for the General.  Elizabeth and her mother often visited the local prisons regularly to overhear information about the enemies’ possible advancements. They often overheard information from the prison guards and inmates and later used the information for their benefit. She was able to decode in messages the potential troop movements for the Union General. She also was able to use former slaves as her accomplice as they worked in the Confederate White House. Together they were able to work together and acquire vital information about the enemy such as strategic plans against the Union. Van Lew reported this information and the union was able to use this to their advantage. This source is significantly historical to women history because although most women chose to not to partake in the war, they played a huge contribution to the success of the Union. I chose this article because the techniques used by spymaster were mind blowing. Spymaster overall were created when getting the job done.

Civilwarsaga.com

Brionna Adams

Women during the Civil War 

The picture I have selected portrays women during the Civil War era, The picture is of Sarah “Sallie” Conley Clayton. Many women took on the role of men during, managing the plantations, shops, things of that nature. The women around that time wanted to support the war efforts so many decided to come together and make clothing for the war. Many women had to become the backbone and head of their households, some women enjoyed the change of pace, and some women didn’t like enjoy the change. The poorer women that was struggling before had to struggle even more. Women had to find jobs anywhere they could, in factories, nursing, anything to keep the family afloat. The African American women had an even hard time, this is some of the issues that women had to go through to survive during the war. The significant of the picture is powerful showing women became in the absence of men.  


Jour ‘Dan Peters 
History 275 Fall 2014

Women during the Civil War

The picture I have selected portrays women during the Civil War era, The picture is of Sarah “Sallie” Conley Clayton. Many women took on the role of men during, managing the plantations, shops, things of that nature. The women around that time wanted to support the war efforts so many decided to come together and make clothing for the war. Many women had to become the backbone and head of their households, some women enjoyed the change of pace, and some women didn’t like enjoy the change. The poorer women that was struggling before had to struggle even more. Women had to find jobs anywhere they could, in factories, nursing, anything to keep the family afloat. The African American women had an even hard time, this is some of the issues that women had to go through to survive during the war. The significant of the picture is powerful showing women became in the absence of men.  

Jour ‘Dan Peters 

History 275 Fall 2014

What I noticed in the book of Women and the making of America and that got my attention was the women being nurses during the civil war (272-273). It talked about how women had really tough rule. Some of the rule that they had was that women had to be from the age groups of (30-40); also they would only recruit middle class white women. The women also had strict dress code like, dark shirts and they had to be without hoops or frills for reasons to not distracted the troops. The year this occurred was in 1861 and it was between the north and south. The people that were involved in this process were white middle class women. African American women were also able to participate but until January 1864. They reason why this is important to women history and the civil war was because war was meant for men and for women to try to be apart of the war it was not looked correct. So it was a big move forward for women because they were able to contribute and aid their country. 
The reason why I picked this topic was because I have a aunt that was a nurse in the Afghanistan war and when I saw this topic it really got my attention. Another reasons why I picked this topic was because I wanted to compare how it was for women to contribute to a war from the past like the civil war to the present like the Afghanistan war.
- Daniel Velasco

What I noticed in the book of Women and the making of America and that got my attention was the women being nurses during the civil war (272-273). It talked about how women had really tough rule. Some of the rule that they had was that women had to be from the age groups of (30-40); also they would only recruit middle class white women. The women also had strict dress code like, dark shirts and they had to be without hoops or frills for reasons to not distracted the troops. The year this occurred was in 1861 and it was between the north and south. The people that were involved in this process were white middle class women. African American women were also able to participate but until January 1864. They reason why this is important to women history and the civil war was because war was meant for men and for women to try to be apart of the war it was not looked correct. So it was a big move forward for women because they were able to contribute and aid their country.

The reason why I picked this topic was because I have a aunt that was a nurse in the Afghanistan war and when I saw this topic it really got my attention. Another reasons why I picked this topic was because I wanted to compare how it was for women to contribute to a war from the past like the civil war to the present like the Afghanistan war.

- Daniel Velasco

Women serving in the civil war was unseen it was only a male dominated force. This however did not stop women from serving and fighting for their country. This led women to place themselves in unlikely situations. Women would dress as men in the civil war and create a different image for themselves. Many women were discovered while others were able to maintain their identity hidden for long 
The image above is an illustration of Deborah Sampson a cross-dressing soldier during the civil war. The illustration seems to be hand drawn and most likely created in the 1860’s. It could have been created by an outside source that could have been hired by Deborah herself to capture her presence in the war. Someone who wanted to document or report the existence of a cross-dressing soldier also could have created it.
Deborah Sampson used to go by her alias Robert Shirtliffe. In particular, her experience as a cross-dressing soldier was similar to that of other women who did the same. Deborah was injured at war and was not only discharged but also discovered. She placed a petition for aid from the army (later approved) to cover for her time at war and injury, aid that only men were given. 
It is a significant image because it depicts the willingness and abilities women at the time had. In particular, it characterizes woman as something more than what they were viewed for in society. Cross-dressing soldiers in essence were a big part of women’s history this showed women crossing boundaries they would not do so before. These women proved to society they could do what men could. They wanted equality and by enlisting in war, it showed they deserved it and they had capabilities men also contained. The courage that cross- dressing soldiers like Deborah showed by risking her life to serve in the war was profound.
-Karla Rodas

Women serving in the civil war was unseen it was only a male dominated force. This however did not stop women from serving and fighting for their country. This led women to place themselves in unlikely situations. Women would dress as men in the civil war and create a different image for themselves. Many women were discovered while others were able to maintain their identity hidden for long 

The image above is an illustration of Deborah Sampson a cross-dressing soldier during the civil war. The illustration seems to be hand drawn and most likely created in the 1860’s. It could have been created by an outside source that could have been hired by Deborah herself to capture her presence in the war. Someone who wanted to document or report the existence of a cross-dressing soldier also could have created it.

Deborah Sampson used to go by her alias Robert Shirtliffe. In particular, her experience as a cross-dressing soldier was similar to that of other women who did the same. Deborah was injured at war and was not only discharged but also discovered. She placed a petition for aid from the army (later approved) to cover for her time at war and injury, aid that only men were given. 

It is a significant image because it depicts the willingness and abilities women at the time had. In particular, it characterizes woman as something more than what they were viewed for in society. Cross-dressing soldiers in essence were a big part of women’s history this showed women crossing boundaries they would not do so before. These women proved to society they could do what men could. They wanted equality and by enlisting in war, it showed they deserved it and they had capabilities men also contained. The courage that cross- dressing soldiers like Deborah showed by risking her life to serve in the war was profound.

-Karla Rodas

Lucy Matilda Thompson

image

        In 1861, when the Civil War had just begun, Lucy Matilda Thompson married Bryant Gauss. As her husband enlisted in the Civil War she soon joined the Confederacy army to be along side with her husband. Lucy feared her husband would be killed and lay unidentified so she joined to fight in the war to be by her husbands side. Neighbors and friends look up to her bravery and kept her identity a secret. It is even said the Owen Captain Robert Tate and Lieutenant Wiley Sykes themselves kept her identity a secret as they admired her. Lucy fought in many battles, but was wounded in her head where  she was staged at a hospital for two months. She was able to return back into battle keeping her identity concealed. Unfortunately, her husband Bryant Gauss was killed at the Seven Days Battle near Richmond. Lucy took charge of her husbands body taking him back home to bury his body. Returning home after serving nearly a year and a half Lucy gave birth to her first child, Mary Gauss. Lucy, widowed with a child, did remarry and had six children. She died at the age of 112 years old.

       This source is historically significant for women’s history and the civil war because we had a women who went into the bloodiest war known in the US for the love for her husband. At the time women did not serve in the army since it was believed women were too fragile and delicate to see blood or naked men. Lucy Guss, however, proved otherwise as she joined the war. Not only did she get wounded, she still managed to return to her husband’s side in the war. This shows a sense of bravery and admiration to any gender. It gives a sense of respect to a women who at at the time was not worth much to the society. Although she fought for the confederate side, Lucy stepped out of her safety zone and fought for the confederates and for her husband.

       I chose to write about Lucy Thompson Gauss at the instant once I read her story. I was admired of her bravery and strength to go to war just to be along with her husband and make sure if anything he was buried properly. I have always believed women have the same capabilities as men but once I hear about being sent into a war, most women as well as myself tend to step back due to fear of fighting. Lucy, however, feared more of her husband lying dead. Such a feat deserves the greatest admiration and respect. We should not only think of ourselves but others.

http://civilwartalk.com/threads/lucy-kenny-pvt-bill-thompson-female-soldier-for-the-confederacy.102750/

- Yasmin A.

Nurses: 
This image shows one of the many roles women took during the Civil War. This particular image shows a women looking over two injured soldiers. About 2,000-5,000 women volunteered as nurses during the time. The following quote was given to women who eagerly wanted to volunteer… Nursing was a grim job that women had to produce, women feed the soldiers,cleaned wounds, gave medication and assisted doctors in surgery.One famous nurse is Clara Barton, She gathered a surplus of medical supplies and donated them to different local battlefields. Barton earned the nickname “Angel of the Battlefield” for her kindness during the time. Later Barton decided to fund The American Red Cross. This source is significant to women’s history and Civil War because, it illustrates the significance and power of a women. All the nurses that worked in different battlefields were volunteers. Without their help, soldiers wouldn’t have the ability to recuperate from their injuries. I chose this source because I feel nurses played a very important role during this time of combat. Women always always seem to serve as a helping hand for the better of tomorrow. 
-Stephanie Islas, History 275, Fall 2014 

Nurses: 

This image shows one of the many roles women took during the Civil War. This particular image shows a women looking over two injured soldiers. About 2,000-5,000 women volunteered as nurses during the time. The following quote was given to women who eagerly wanted to volunteer… Nursing was a grim job that women had to produce, women feed the soldiers,cleaned wounds, gave medication and assisted doctors in surgery.One famous nurse is Clara Barton, She gathered a surplus of medical supplies and donated them to different local battlefields. Barton earned the nickname “Angel of the Battlefield” for her kindness during the time. Later Barton decided to fund The American Red Cross. This source is significant to women’s history and Civil War because, it illustrates the significance and power of a women. All the nurses that worked in different battlefields were volunteers. Without their help, soldiers wouldn’t have the ability to recuperate from their injuries. I chose this source because I feel nurses played a very important role during this time of combat. Women always always seem to serve as a helping hand for the better of tomorrow. 

-Stephanie Islas, History 275, Fall 2014 

Harris, E. H. Letters (Society Collection- Collection 22)

     In 1862, E.H. Harris decided to leave home in order to volunteer at a hospital and help wounded soldiers. Since many of the hospitals were very limited with nurses, she wanted to specifically assist those who were having near death experiences because they were given little to no attention. Many of them were dying of injuries, starvation, and even their own personal hygiene. Throughout her journey she would write letters to the organization addressing her concerns and experiences with many of the soldiers. Her letters grabbed the attention of many of the members there that they decided to share her stories in a pamphlet titled “Anecdotes of Our Wounded and Dying Soldiers in the Rebellion.” She would rarely send letters about herself, but when she did she would mention the blood stains in her clothing and the many duties that she had to do. For instance, she would bathe, feed, visit, and assist operations and amputations, however that did not stop her from volunteering.

                This passage is historically significant for women’s history and the Civil War because it gives the reader a different perspective on Civil War. While many know the war side of the story, others do not know the behind-the-scenes part. Women played a significant role since they were the ones who men would come to after they became wounded. There were a lot of women like E.H. Harris who dedicated a portion of their time volunteering and helping soldiers. Without the help of women many of the ones who survived would have died. Also, because of E.H. Harris, many people became aware of the situation since her letters were publicized. I chose this passage at random because it took me a while to find an excerpt that I wanted to read. Originally I wanted to analyze a picture, however I came across this story and as I was reading it, it spoke to me. I began to think about what I would do if I was a woman in the Civil War and the first thing that came to mind was volunteering.  A part of me felt inspired by what E.H. Harris did and another part of me felt scared for her, however it became a great turnout.

- Daisy Estrada

(http://hsp.org/collections/catalogs-research-tools/subject-guides/women-during-the-civil-war)

Rose O’Neal Greenhow was a confederate spy during the Civil War.She moved in important political circles and made friendships with presidents, generals, senators, and high-ranking military officers. That way she used key information to pass on to the Confederate Army. She was imprisoned first in her home and then in Old Capitol. Despite her imprisonement she still managed to send messages to the Confederate Army.This was a significant for women’s history and the Civil War because it gave women the confidence and self worth they deserved for great achievements. This helped the Civil War because women could gain access to the opponent side more easily, they could hide important messages under their dresses. Their patriotism was very strong to take upon a risky situation of espionage. I chose this women because she like many other women showed their patriotism and did everything in their power to help their side win but besides that she was credited by Jefferson Davis for the win of the south in the Battle of Bull Run in July 186.
-Noemi Cervantes 
http://library.duke.edu/rubenstein/scriptorium/greenhow/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rose_O’Neal_Greenhow

Rose O’Neal Greenhow was a confederate spy during the Civil War.She moved in important political circles and made friendships with presidents, generals, senators, and high-ranking military officers. That way she used key information to pass on to the Confederate Army. She was imprisoned first in her home and then in Old Capitol. Despite her imprisonement she still managed to send messages to the Confederate Army.This was a significant for women’s history and the Civil War because it gave women the confidence and self worth they deserved for great achievements. This helped the Civil War because women could gain access to the opponent side more easily, they could hide important messages under their dresses. Their patriotism was very strong to take upon a risky situation of espionage. I chose this women because she like many other women showed their patriotism and did everything in their power to help their side win but besides that she was credited by Jefferson Davis for the win of the south in the Battle of Bull Run in July 186.

-Noemi Cervantes 

http://library.duke.edu/rubenstein/scriptorium/greenhow/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rose_O’Neal_Greenhow

This is a picture of Sarah Edmonds. She was a female solider and a nurse in the army. Before she enlisted in the army she had to disguise herself as a man to immigrate to the United States to get away from her abusive father. She then enlisted in the army still as a man because women weren’t allowed to fight in the war. Edmonds was a nurse in the army for several months until her division got sent to Kentucky where she got malaria. She didn’t get it looked at because she feared it would blow her cover. So when she got better, she then worked as a nurse again until the end of the war but she wasn’t in disguise anymore.
This is significant for woman’s history because it shows that women can really do anything that men can do including fighting in the war. Also, it shows how women really felt about their roles. This is significant to the Civil War because without women, the men wouldn’t have been able to fight with enough people in their army and women can do more than their supposed to.
-Mariah Gonzales

This is a picture of Sarah Edmonds. She was a female solider and a nurse in the army. Before she enlisted in the army she had to disguise herself as a man to immigrate to the United States to get away from her abusive father. She then enlisted in the army still as a man because women weren’t allowed to fight in the war. Edmonds was a nurse in the army for several months until her division got sent to Kentucky where she got malaria. She didn’t get it looked at because she feared it would blow her cover. So when she got better, she then worked as a nurse again until the end of the war but she wasn’t in disguise anymore.

This is significant for woman’s history because it shows that women can really do anything that men can do including fighting in the war. Also, it shows how women really felt about their roles. This is significant to the Civil War because without women, the men wouldn’t have been able to fight with enough people in their army and women can do more than their supposed to.

-Mariah Gonzales

This is a photo of Pauline Cushman, a spy for the Union Army during the Civil War. Pauline was caught and able to escape a sentencing and return back to the North. She was awarded an award by President Abraham Lincoln.  This is important to woman history as it shows how much of a factor that woman were in the war, that women weren’t the usual girls that stayed at home and took care of the kids or did the laundry. It shows that women finally got a bit dirty to fight for their country. They were looked at as a United States citizen like men. This was produced in order to show the dangerous jobs weren’t always given to men. Women helped the most not only for the end of rascism but for an image for themselves. 

http://thewritesisters.blogspot.com/2011/10/women-of-wednesday-pauline-cushman.html
-Matt Yracheta

This is a photo of Pauline Cushman, a spy for the Union Army during the Civil War. Pauline was caught and able to escape a sentencing and return back to the North. She was awarded an award by President Abraham Lincoln.  This is important to woman history as it shows how much of a factor that woman were in the war, that women weren’t the usual girls that stayed at home and took care of the kids or did the laundry. It shows that women finally got a bit dirty to fight for their country. They were looked at as a United States citizen like men. This was produced in order to show the dangerous jobs weren’t always given to men. Women helped the most not only for the end of rascism but for an image for themselves. 

http://thewritesisters.blogspot.com/2011/10/women-of-wednesday-pauline-cushman.html

-Matt Yracheta